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About Yr Profs


Selfie portrait of JRE

 

 

 

 

 

I am Jesse Rice-Evans (she/her/hers), a PhD student in rhetoric and composition at the CUNY Graduate Center studying digital rhetoric, embodiment theory, and disability writing. Because of my interest in critical politics and cultural studies, my work stretches across many areas in the humanities, but my current research looks at queer and disabled communities creating their own dialects on Twitter, and the queer meme community on Instagram. I am *stoked* to be the first-ever queer instructor to teach a queer literature class at CCNY (alongside Prof. Stella, of course).

This semester, I’m letting all my students know a bit about my own access needs:

  1. Please refrain from wearing or applying any scented products in our classroom, including lotions, cologne or perfume, essential oils, clothes soaked in fragrant laundry detergent, etc.
  2. I have an undiagnosed neurological condition that affects my memory, ability to concentrate or tune out background noise, and sometimes means that I will forget words, your names, or what I was just talking about. Please practice patience with me, and know that I will do my best to communicate to y’all if I’m feeling especially symptomatic. Here’s a video about brain fog and cognitive impairment if y’all are curious 🙂
  3. I also have a chronic pain and fatigue disorder, which is one of the reasons this course will exist ~40% online. Sometimes, this means I’ll be running late waiting for the shuttle from 145th and sometimes it means that I’ll need to cancel class. I am committed to communicating this as far in advance as I possibly can, so please be prepared to check our course site *regularly*.

                                 
I’m Andréa Stella, also a PhD student in composition and rhetoric at the CUNY Graduate Center. I’m a Gemini and my research foci are anti-racist pedagogies, harm reduction strategies in institutional settings, and femme/queer everything. Hopefully this semester will challenge your perception of academia and the dreaded “English” classroom.

 

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